OUR PARTNERS

CWLA is proud to collaborate and partner with a number of organizations as we work to promote children, youth, and their families and protect every child from harm.

In addition to the national partner organizations listed on this page, we are proud to work in partnership with our member organizations.  Member organizations provide knowledge, information, experience and relationships that enhance and bring credibility to our work.

CWLA MEMBER PARTNERS

Our member organizations are located in hundreds of communities and towns across the country.  They include public and private direct service organizations in almost every practice area related to vulnerable children and families; national, regional, state and local advocacy organizations; training and educational organizations, including major schools of social work and individuals.

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NATIONAL PARTNERS

Boots on Ground Consulting

bootsBoots on Ground Consulting, Inc. recognizes the sacrifice our service members and their families make and feel it is crucial to provide them with quality care when they need help. Boots on Ground Consulting offers training for professionals who work with this population. They train professionals in the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively work with service members, veterans, and their families.

Casey Family Programs

William C. Bell, President and CEO

Casey Logo_0Casey Family Programs is committed to helping states, counties and tribes implement effective child welfare practices.  The organization supports and assists child welfare systems in their efforts to protect children and create strong families. Children do best in stable families and familiar environments. This gives them the best chance to grow into successful adults.

Casey Family Programs is the nation’s largest operating foundation focused entirely on foster care and improving the child welfare system. Founded in 1966, we work to provide and improve ─ and ultimately prevent the need for ─ foster care in the United States. As champions for change, we are committed to our 2020 Strategy for America’s Children – a goal to safely reduce the number of children in foster care and improve the lives of those who remain in care.

Since our founding in 1966, we have invested more than $1.6 billion in programs and services to benefit children and families in the child welfare system. Over the next decade, we will invest at least $1 billion more to fulfill the promise of our 2020 Strategy.

We have decades of front-line experience in foster care and are committed to helping states, counties and tribes implement effective child welfare practices. We provide nonpartisan research and technical expertise to child welfare system leaders, members of Congress and state legislators so they may craft laws and policies to better the lives of children in foster care, children at risk of entering the system and their families. The foundation, established by United Parcel Service founder Jim Casey, is based in Seattle.

Child Welfare League of Canada

Gordon Phaneuf, MSW, RSW
Chief Executive Officer

cwlclogoMission:  The Child Welfare League of Canada is a national membership organization working to influence legislation, policy, and programs which improve outcomes for children, youth and their families, especially those facing challenging circumstances.

History:  The Child Welfare League of Canada (CWLC) is the voice for vulnerable children in Canada. Established in 1994, CWLC is a national, membership-based organization dedicated to promoting the protection and well-being of vulnerable children, youth and their families. We play a significant role in promoting best practices among those in the field of child welfare, child and youth mental health, child rights and youth justice.

Many years before the Child Welfare League of Canada (CWLC) was founded, Canadians working in the field of child and youth services were active in the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA), the oldest and largest North American organization devoted to the well-being of children. Indeed, Canadian agencies and government departments have been members of the CWLA since the late 1920s.  In the mid 1980s, a number of Canadian members asked the CWLA to provide stronger membership services in Canada, and as a result, the CWLA hired a Canadian consultant to provide membership support and to conduct a needs assessment.  Two priorities emerged: first, the need for a Canadian public policy symposium and, second, the need to explore the potential for a stronger, more permanent CWLA presence in Canada, possibly with a Canadian office.

A Canadian office of the CWLA opened in Ottawa in January, 1992. It was able to respond to the need for a stronger emphasis on public policy and advocacy – functions that could not be handled by a headquarters in the U.S.

In May 1992, CWLA/Canada members set up a National Steering Committee, that recommended the establishment of the Child Welfare League of Canada, which would continue its affiliation with CWLA to ensure Canadian members access to special CWLA services and publications. The CWLA agreed to provide financial support for the Canadian organization for three years.

The Child Welfare League of Canada was incorporated under federal law in April 1994 and received its status as a charitable organization in October 1994.

Today, the Child Welfare League of Canada is a fully national organization with over 100 members in all provinces and territories, including representation at the federal level. Member organizations include provincial/territorial ministries of child and family services, child and family service agencies, health and social services, youth services and university research units and faculties. CWLC members serve over a million families and children each year.

Council on Accreditation

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The Council on Accreditation (COA) is an international, independent, nonprofit, child- and family-service and behavioral healthcare accrediting organization. It was founded in 1977 by the Child Welfare League of America and Family Service America (now the Alliance for Children and Families). Originally known as an accrediting body for family and children’s agencies, COA currently accredits 50 different service areas and over 125 types of programs.

The Donaldson Adoption Institute

April Dinwoodie,  President and CEO

1601083_10151837059921746_2040084460_nMission:  The Donaldson Adoption Institute’s mission is to provide leadership that improves laws, policies and practices – through sound research, education and advocacy – in order to better the lives of everyone touched by adoption.

History:  The Adoption Institute was established in 1996 by the Board of Spence­-Chapin Services to Families and Children (now Spence-­Chapin), which identified the need for an independent and objective adoption research and policy organization that addressed the needs of all those touched by adoption – first/birth parents, adoptees and adoptive parents.

In 1997, the Institute was named in honor of Evan B. Donaldson, a member of the Spence­-Chapin Board of Directors for nearly 20 years, serving as president from 1986 until her death in 1994.

Foster Family-Based Treatment Association

David Schild, Executive Administrator

ffta_logoMission:  The Foster Family-based Treatment Association strengthens agencies that support families caring for vulnerable children.

History:  The Foster Family-based Treatment Association (FFTA) is an agency-led organization of treatment foster care providers established in 1988 with an initial purpose of defining and refining Treatment Foster Care practices. The Association’s membership is composed of agencies

throughout North America currently operating treatment foster care programs. Organizations that are not direct service providers, but have an interest in the field, hold affiliate membership status. FFTA is assisted by recognized researchers and policy-makers in the fields of child welfare and mental health.

Foster Care Alumni of America

Adam Robe-CEO

FCAA-01Mission:  The mission of Foster Care Alumni of America is to connect the alumni community and to transform policy and practice, ensuring opportunity for people in and from foster care.

History:  The first phase of the organized national alumni movement came in 1999 when Casey Family Programs began extensive interviews with over 1800 alumni of the foster care system from across the country for the National Alumni Study. As researchers talked with alumni, they heard over and over “I want to do something to improve foster care. How can I get involved?” Recognizing that alumni brought passion, insight, and expertise that could only be gained by living in foster care, Casey Family Programs created the Alumni Relations department in 2000.

During its first two years, the Alumni Relations department made connections with 1400 alumni from all over the United States. The department found that alumni were active in work on behalf of people in and from foster care in various ways:
Many were foster parents, kinship caregivers and adoptive parents.
Many were social workers, researchers, legal professionals and advocates.
Alumni were participating in foster care program development, legislative advocacy, training for care providers and professionals and speaking publicly about their experiences.

With support from Casey, alumni began to meet one another and work together. From our first meetings, we found incredible strength in each other—a feeling of belonging and kinship that so many of us had grown up without ever knowing. We discovered that we share a culture – the culture of foster care – that gives us an understanding of each other across the ages, across geography, across ethnicities. Our shared culture and experiences form the basis for a community of alumni with a common voice. Bringing together efforts of individual alumni, the alumni movement was born!

In 2004 Casey Family Programs made a significant investment in the alumni movement by generously supporting the creation of Foster Care Alumni of America. Growing since that time, FCAA is now establishing chapters around the country and building our membership to harness the power of alumni and our allies to make real change.

Ghost Note

Brandon Ellis-CEO
Ghost-Note-Logo Ghost Note is a strategic communications and development agency based in Washington, DC. We are committed to truly understanding the unique qualities that differentiate our clients and then crafting strategies designed to introduce those qualities to the people they need to reach.

The principals of Ghost Note bring extensive experience working within or as consultants for Fortune 100 companies and leading nonprofits. We have led teams charged with introducing top brands to major urban markets, crafted compelling messages designed to help common citizens understand complex government programs and built digital tools that allow users to intuitively connect with others throughout the world.

Good360

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Good360 is a 501(c) (3) organization. Good360’s mission is to help companies, charities, and individuals do good, better. Good360 receives donations from a wide range of companies, including several Fortune 100 technology, retail, and consumer corporations. It distributes these donations to community charities across the United States and throughout the world. Good360 is acknowledged as one of the most cost-efficient charities by Forbes magazine.

GrantStation

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GrantStation.com, Inc. (GrantStation) offers nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, and government agencies the opportunity to identify potential funding sources for their programs or projects as well as resources to mentor these organizations through the grantseeking process.

Job Target

JobTarget

JobTarget makes the complex processes of finding jobs and recruiting talent more efficient with technology that powers job websites and career centers, and technology that helps employers advertise jobs where they will attract the most qualified talent.

National Foster Parent Association

Irene Clements-President

Supporting foster, adoptive and kinship parents nationally.

nfpasmallMission:  To support foster parents in achieving safety, permanence and well-being for the children and youth in their care.

History:  The National Foster Parent Association is a non-profit, volunteer organization established in 1972 as a result of the concerns of several independent groups that felt the country needed a national organization to meet the needs of foster families in the United States.

In August 1971, the Child Welfare League of America received a three-year grant to establish a national organization for foster parents. The League immediately established a foster parent project to begin creating the organization.

Today, NFPA has grown from an original group of 926 foster parents, 210 social workers and 59 other professionals to an organization that represents thousands of foster families nationwide through foster parent affiliates.

National Indian Child Welfare Association

Terry L. Cross, MSW, ACSW, LCSW (Seneca Nation of Indians)

Horiz wtag CMYK smallerMission:  The National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) is dedicated to the well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native children and families.

The National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) is a national voice for American Indian children and families. We are the most comprehensive source of information on American Indian child welfare and the only national American Indian organization focused specifically on the tribal capacity to prevent child abuse and neglect.

NICWA is a private, nonprofit, membership organization based in Portland, Oregon. Our members include tribes, individuals—both Indian and non-Indian—and private organizations from around the United States concerned with American Indian child and family issues. Together, our partnersboard, and staff work to protect the most vital resource of American Indian people—our children.

Open Minds

logo_header OPEN MINDS is the premier market intelligence and management support firm specializing in the sectors of the health and human service field serving consumers with chronic conditions and complex support needs.  The mission of OPEN MINDS is to provide health and human service payers and provider organizations – and the organizations that serve them – with the market and management knowledge needed to improve their organizational efficiency and effectiveness.

Purchasing Point

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This savings program is provided through membership in a group purchasing cooperative: AdvantageTrust, a division of HealthTrust Purchasing Group. Discounts in the program are based on $19 billion in annual purchasing by some of the nation’s largest nonprofits. As a result, the program provides access to a level of pricing typically reserved for Fortune 100 companies.

Relias Academy

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Relias Learning is an e-learning company providing accredited, approved, and certified courses for efficient staff training. Our course content is tailored specifically for facilities involved with senior care, health and human services, intellectual and developmental disabilities, and correctional facilities.

UST

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UST’s purpose is to help nonprofit organizations manage and reduce their unemployment costs, while also helping remove back-office burden and paperwork, so they have more time and more money for their missions. The Unemployment Services Trust (UST) is an alternative to paying state unemployment taxes for nonprofits, as allowed by Federal law.