A reauthorization of the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) is still in the evolutionary stage but while talks and discussions are taking place, CWLA and others are seeking significant increases in CAPTA state grants and the CB-CAP program.

The increase CWLA and others are seeking is $500 million for Title I of CAPTA and $500 million for Title II, more commonly referred to community-based child abuse prevention (CB-CAP) program.

The National Child Abuse Coalition has released the National Child Abuse Coalition recommendations, Taking CAPTA to the Next Level. These recommendations set a framework for increasing the focus on primary prevention both through the CAPTA state grants and the CB-CAP grants. It is a theme that should receive a positive response from the Children’s Bureau and Associate Commissioner Jerry Milner who has placed a heavy emphasis on primary prevention—preventing child abuse before it happens.

CAPTA did receive an historic appropriation increase in the FY 2018 and 2019 when Congress added in $60 million to the $25 million state grants. This was the single biggest increase and overall total state grant funding in the 1974 law’s history. The National Commission to End Child Abuse and Neglect (CECANF) in its 2016 report, recommended that Congress authorize and appropriate at least a $1 billion increase to the base allotment for CAPTA as a down payment on improving our nation’s commitment to improving outcomes for children and parents and families and preventing the need for foster care.

The 2019 CWLA Legislative Agenda will make a major priority out of increasing funding for CAPTA as a way to build on one part of the continuum of child welfare services—primary prevention of child maltreatment.

CWLA members will go to Capitol Hill on Thursday, April 11, as part of the CWLA National Conference. Register here.

To help you set up your Capitol Hill appointment go to the CWLA ACTION CENTER to get an easy link to your Senate & House offices.

About the Author:

John Sciamanna is CWLA's Vice President of Public Policy.

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