WeR4Kdz
An E-bulletin brought to you by The Child Welfare League of America

   
   

Study Finds Austin, TX, Safest Place for Child Pedestrians

11/29/2005:   Austin, Texas is the safest U.S. metro area for child pedestrians, while the most dangerous areas are Memphis, Tennessee, St. Louis, Missouri, and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, according to the study, Child Pedestrians at Risk: A Ranking of U.S. Metropolitan Areas, released by Safe Kids Worldwide.

The Safe Kids study compares child pedestrian safety in 47 metropolitan areas and explores how different factors influence the safety of a child's pedestrian environment. The study also found that communities are most successful in creating safe pedestrian environments for children when they develop and implement solutions at the local level.

"It's not enough to teach your children to look both ways when they cross the street," says Martin Eichelberger, President and CEO of Safe Kids Worldwide. "Civic organizations, schools, police, local governments, and caregivers each have a role to play in creating safe walking environments. Children need to learn safe behavior, but children do not bear the ultimate responsibility for pedestrian safety. Whole communities do."

In 2002, 599 children ages 14 and under died in pedestrian accidents, and an estimated 38,400 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for pedestrian-related injuries in 2003, according to the study.


Click here to see the list of past issues.

If you know of others who would like their names added to this list, please have them visit www.cwla.org/wer4kdz/wer4kdz.htm. To remove yourself from this list, send an e-mail to wer4kdz@cwla.org with "Remove from WeR4Kdz List" in the subject line.

© Child Welfare League of America. The content of this publication may not be reproduced in any way, including posting on the Internet, without the permission of CWLA. For permission to use material from CWLA's website or publications, contact us using our website assistance form.

The contents of WeR4Kdz do not necessarily reflect the views of the Child Welfare League of America nor represent an endorsement of opinions, products, or services.