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Home > Advocacy > State Fact Sheets for 2008 > Minnesota

 
 

MINNESOTA'S CHILDREN 2008

Minnesota's Children At a Glance

 
 State Population 1  5,167,101 
 Population, Children Under 18 2  1,229,578 
 State Poverty Rate 3  8.2% 
 Poverty Rate, Children Under 18 4  11.1% 
 Poverty Rate, Children Ages 5-17 5  9.9% 
 Poverty Rate, Children Under 5 6  14.6% 
All statistics are for 2006.

CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT

  • In 2005, Minnesota had 54,767 total referrals for child abuse and neglect. Of those, 18,843 reports were referred for investigation. 7
  • In 2005, 5,561 children were substantiated or indicated as abused or neglected in Minnesota, a rate of 6.9 per 1,000 children, and represent- ing a 4.3% increase from 2004. Of these children, 76.4% were neglected, 16.9% were physically abused, and 10.7% were sexually abused. 8
  • In 2005, 15 children died as a result of abuse or neglect in Minnesota. 9
  • In 2005, 6,978 children in Minnesota lived apart from their families in out-of-home care, compared with 7,038 children in 2004. In 2005, 26.1% of the children living apart from their families were age 5 or younger, and 25.7% were 16 or older. 10
  • Of the children in out-of-home care in 2005, 49.9% were white, 19.4% black, 8.4% Hispanic, 12.2% American Indian/Alaskan Native, and 10.2% children of other races and ethnicities. 11

PERMANENT FAMILIES FOR CHILDREN

  • Of the 7,308 children exiting out-of-home care in 2005, 70.6% were reunited with their parents or other family members. 12
  • In 2005, 732 children were legally adopted through the public child welfare agency in Minnesota, a 17.6% increase from 603 in 2004. 13
  • Of the 6,978 children in out-of-home care in 2005, 1,585, or 22.7%, were waiting to be adopted. 14

KINSHIP SUPPORT

  • In 2005, approximately 21,402 Minnesota grandparents had primary responsibility caring for their grandchildren. 15
  • Of the 6,978 children in out-of-home care in 2005, 23.2% were living with relatives while in care. 16
  • Of all Minnesota children in kinship care in 2005, 44.9% were white, 21.1% were black, 6.7% were Hispanic, 15.8% were American Indian/ Alaskan Native, and 11.6% were other races. 17

CHILD POVERTY AND INCOME SUPPORT

  • The total individuals receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in Minnesota decreased from 67,331 in March 2006 to 63,573 in March 2007, a decrease of 5.9%. The number of families receiving TANF in March 2007 was 26,646, a 6.2% decrease from March 2006. 18
  • In 2003, a family of three receiving only TANF and food stamp benefits in Minnesota was at 42.4% of the federal poverty level. 19
  • In 2006, Minnesota spent $402,737,483 in TANF funds, including 32.1% on basic assistance, 67.9% on nonassistance, and none on child care or transportation. 20
  • In 2006, Minnesota collected and distributed $584,188,523 in child support funds, an increase of 2.7% from 2005. 21
  • In 2006, the fair market rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Minnesota was $753 per month. The wage necessary to afford this two-bedroom apartment was $14.47 per hour working a 40-hour week. 22

CHILD CARE AND HEAD START

  • In 2005, Minnesota had an estimated monthly average of 25,500 children served by subsidized child care; 22,100 children received subsidized child care in 2004, and 25,700 in 2003. 23
  • In 2007, to be eligible for subsidized child care in Minnesota a family of three could make no more than $29,050, which is equivalent to 44% of the state's median income. 24
  • In 2007, Minnesota had 3,077 children on its waiting list for child care assistance. 25
  • In 2006, Head Start served 10,332 Minnesota children, the same as in 2005. 26

HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE

  • In 2004, 376,000 children younger than 19 were enrolled in Medicaid in Minnesota, representing 49.4% of the total number of enrollees. 27
  • In 2004, 9,112 children were enrolled in Medicaid in Minnesota on the basis of being in foster care. 28
  • In 2004, Minnesota spent $65,903,963 on Medicaid services for children in foster care, and $7,233 per foster care enrollee on Medicaid services. 29
  • Minnesota reported spending $15,971,072 of its total Medicaid spending in 2004 for children in foster care on targeted case management services. 30
  • Minnesota reported spending $3,308,147 of its total Medicaid expenditures in 2004 for foster children on rehabilitative services. 31
  • In 2006, Minnesota had 5,343 children enrolled in its Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), a 5% increase from 2005, when 5,076 children were enrolled. 32
  • In 2004, 4,604 babies were born weighing less than 2,500 grams, giving Minnesota a rank of 6 nationally in percent of low-weight births (1 being the best, and 50 the worst). 33
  • In 2004, 332 infants younger than age 1 died in Minnesota, giving it a rank of 3 nationally in infant mortality rates (1 being the best, and 50 the worst). 34
  • In 2004, the birth rate for teens 15-17 in Minnesota was 13.6 births per 1,000 girls; for teens 18-19, the rate was 45.5. This reflects a total rate of 26.7 births per 1,000 girls ages 15-19. 35
  • Cumulative through 2005, 5,225 adults and adolescents, as well as 28 children under the age of 13, were reported as having HIV/AIDS in Minnesota. 36
  • In 2005, an estimated 38,000 children ages 12-17, and 258,000 adults 26 and older, were dependent on or abusing illicit drugs or alcohol in Minnesota. 37

VULNERABLE YOUTH

  • In 2005, 655 children aged out of out-of-home care in Minnesota. 38
  • In 2005, 11,000 Minnesota teens ages 16-19 were high school dropouts. 39
  • In 2005, 10% of teens ages 16-19 were not enrolled in school, were not working, and had no degree beyond high school. 40
  • In 2005, approximately 18,000 children ages 12-17 in Minnesota needed but had not received treatment for illicit drug use in the past year. 41
  • In 2005, approximately 26,000 children ages 12-17 needed but had not received treatment for alcohol use in the past year. 42
  • In 2004, 44 children younger than 20 committed suicide, a rate of 3.11 per 100,000 children. 43

JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION

  • In 2004, 15 children younger than 18 were killed in firearm homicides in Minnesota, a 200% increase from 5 in 2003. 44
  • A 2003 census of juvenile offenders showed 1,527 children in juvenile correction facilities in Minnesota. 45

FUNDING CHILD WELFARE SERVICES FOR MINNESOTA'S CHILDREN

  • In 2004, Minnesota spent $563,624,754 for child welfare services. Child welfare services are all direct and administrative services the state agency provides to children and families. Of this amount, 39% was from federal funds, 15% was from state funds, and 47% was from local funds. 46
  • In 2004, of the $217,452,533 in federal funds received for child welfare, 41% was from Title IV-E Foster Care and Adoption Assistance, 4% came from Title IV-B Child Welfare Services and Promoting Safe and Stable Families, 25% was from Medicaid, 9% came from the Social Services Block Grant, and 20% came from other federal sources. 47
  • Out of 6,978 children in out-of-home care in Minnesota in 2005, only 2,461 children, or 35.3%, received Title IV-E federal foster care assistance. 48

MINNESOTA'S CHILD WELFARE WORKFORCE

  • A 2003 General Accounting Office (GAO) report documented that staff shortages, high caseloads, high worker turnover and low salaries impinge on delivering services to achieve safety, permanence, and well being for children. 49
  • The federal Child and Family Service Reviews have clearly demonstrated that the more time a caseworker spends with a child and family, the better the outcomes for those children and families. 50
  • According to the 2003 GAO report, the average caseload for child welfare/foster care caseworkers is 24-31 children; these high caseloads contribute to high worker turnover and insufficient services being provided to children and families. CWLA recommends that foster care caseworkers have case-loads of 12-15 children. 51
  • In 2004, the minimum annual salary for a caseworker responsible for investigating reports of abuse and neglect in Minnesota was $29,268; the median income for a family of four was $76,733.52

REFERENCES

  1. U.S. Bureau of the Census, Population Division. (2006). Table 1: Annual Estimates of the Population for the United States and States, and for Puerto Rico: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (NST_EST2006_ALLDATA). Retrieved online November 12, 2007. Washington, DC: Author. back
  2. Administration on Children, Youth and Families. (2007). Child Maltreatment 2005: Reports From the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. Retrieved online November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  3. U.S. Bureau of the Census. (2007). Current Population Survey, 2007 Annual Social and Economic Supplement. Poverty Status by State: 2006. Retrieved November 12, 2007. Washington, DC: Author. back
  4. U.S. Bureau of the Census. (2007). Current Population Survey, 2007 Annual Social and Economic Supplement. Poverty Status by State: 2006: People Under 18 Years of Age. Retrieved November 12, 2007. Washington, DC: Author. back
  5. U.S. Bureau of the Census. (2007). Current Population Survey, 2007 Annual Social and Economic Supplement. Poverty Status by State: 2006: Related Children 5 to 17 Years of Age. Retrieved November 12, 2007. Washington, DC: Author. back
  6. U.S. Bureau of the Census. (2007). 2006 American Community Survey, Selected Economic Characteristics. Retrieved November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: Author. back
  7. Administration on Children, Youth and Families. (2007). Child Maltreatment 2005: Reports From the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. Retrieved November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  8. Administration on Children, Youth and Families. (2007). Child Maltreatment 2005: Reports From the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. Retrieved November 16, 2007 and table3_6.htm. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  9. Administration on Children, Youth and Families. (2007). Child Maltreatment 2005: Reports From the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. Retrieved November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  10. Child Welfare League of America. (2007). Special tabulation of the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis Reporting System. Washington, DC: Author. back
  11. "Other races and ethnicities" includes Asian, Pacific Islander, Hawaiian Native, unknown or unable to determine, missing data and two or more races. CWLA (2007) Special AFCARS tabulation. back
  12. CWLA (2007) Special AFCARS tabulation. back
  13. Ibid; CWLA (2006) Special AFCARS tabulation. back
  14. CWLA (2007) Special AFCARS tabulation. back
  15. U.S. Census Bureau. (2006). 2006 American Community Survey, Data Profile. Selected Social Characteristics: 2005. Retrieved online November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: Author. back
  16. CWLA (2006) Special AFCARS tabulation. back
  17. Ibid. back
  18. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance. (n.d.). Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Separate State Program-Maintenance of Effort Aid to Families with Dependant Children: Caseload Data. Retrieved online, November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  19. Calculations by CWLA, based on U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2006). Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program: Sixth Annual Report to Congress. Retrieved online November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: Author; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service. (2005). Food Stamp Program-Annual State Level Data - State Level Participation. Characteristics of Food Stamp Households: FY 2003. Retrieved online November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: Author; U.S. Department on Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. (2003). The 2003 HHS Poverty Guidelines. Retrieved online, November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: Author. back
  20. Administration for Children and Families. (2004). Combined Spending of Federal and States Funds Expended in FY 2004 Through the Fourth Quarter. Retrieved online, October 13, 2005. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  21. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Support Enforcement. (2007). Preliminary Data Report FY 2006, State Boxscores for FY 2006. Retrieved online, November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  22. Pitcoff, W.; Pelletiere, D.; Crowley, S.; Treskon, M.; & Dolbeare, C. (2007). Out of Reach 2006. Retrieved online, November 16, 2007. Washington, DC: National Low Income Housing Coalition. back
  23. Administration on Children and Families, Child Care Bureau. (2005). FFY 2005 CCDF Data Tables and Charts; Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Children and Families Served. Retrieved online, October 2, 2006. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Administration on Children and Families, Child Care Bureau. (2003). FFY 2003 CCDF Data Tables and Charts; Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Children and Families Served. Retrieved online, October 2, 2006. Washington, DC: HHS; Administration on Children and Families, Child Care Bureau. (2004). FFY 2004 CCDF Data Tables and Charts; Average Monthly Adjusted Number of Children and Families Served. Retrieved online, October 2, 2006. Washington, DC: HHS. back
  24. Schulman, K., & Blank, H. (2007). State Child Care Assistance Policies 2007: Some Steps Forward, More Progress Needed. Retrieved online, November 19, 2007. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center. back
  25. Ibid. back
  26. Administration for Children and Families, Head Start Bureau. (2007). Head Start Fact Sheet. Retrieved online, November 19, 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Administration for Children and Families, Head Start Bureau. (2006). Head Start Fact Sheet. Retrieved online, October 2, 2006, from www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/hsb/research/2006.htm. Washington, DC: HHS. back
  27. Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. (2007). State Medicaid Fact Sheets. Retrieved online, November 26, 2007. Menlo Park, CA: Author. back
  28. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (n.d.). Medicaid Statistical Information System (MSIS). Retrieved November 21, 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  29. Ibid. back
  30. Ibid. back
  31. Ibid. back
  32. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (2007). FY 2006 Number of Children Ever Enrolled Year-SCHIP by Program Type. Retrieved online November 21, 2007. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. back
  33. Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2007). Kids Count. State Level Data Online: Comparisons by Topic: Low birth weight babies: Number: 2004. Retrieved online, November 21, 2007. Baltimore: Author; Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2007). Kids Count. State Level Data Online: Comparisons by Topic: Low birth weight babies: Percent: 2004. Retrieved online, November 21, 2007. Baltimore: Author. back
  34. Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2007). Kids Count. State Level Data Online: Comparisons by Topic: Infant Mortality: Number: 2004. Retrieved online, November 21, 2007. Baltimore: Author; Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2007). Kids Count. State Level Data Online: Comparisons by Topic: Infant Mortality: Rate: 2004. Retrieved online, November 21, 2007. Baltimore: Author. back
  35. Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2007). Kids Count. State Level Data Online: Comparisons by Topic: Teen Births, by Age Group, Rate per 1,000: 2004. Retrieved online, November 21, 2007. Baltimore: Author. back
  36. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2007). HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2005. Vol. 17. Retrieved online November 21, 2007. Atlanta: Author. back
  37. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Office of Applied Studies. (2007). State Estimates of Substance Use from the 2004-2005 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Retrieved online November 21, 2007. Rockville, MD: Author. back
  38. Children who aged out of foster care are captured by the AFCARS emancipation data element. Children who exit care to emancipation are those who reached the age of majority. CWLA (2007) Special AFCARS tabulation. back
  39. Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2007). Kids Count. State Level Data Online: Comparisons by Topic: Teens who are high school dropouts: Number: 2005. Retrieved online, November 26, 2007. Baltimore: Author. back
  40. Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2007). Kids Count. State Level Data Online: Comparisons by Topic: Teens not attending school and not working: Percent: 2005. Retrieved online, November 26, 2007. Baltimore: Author. back
  41. SAMHSA, State Estimates of Substance Useback
  42. Ibid. back
  43. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. (2007). Injury Mortality Reports, 1999-2004. Retrieved online, November 28, 2007. Washington, DC: Author. back
  44. Ibid. back
  45. Sickmund, M.; Sladky, T.J., & Kang, W. (2005). Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement Databook. Retrieved online October 3, 2006. Washington, DC: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. back
  46. Examples of direct services include child abuse/neglect investigations, foster care, community based programs, case management, and all such services that are required for the safety, permanency, and well being of children. Examples of administrative services include management information systems, training programs, eligibility determination processes, and all services that provide the infrastructure supports for the public agency. Scarcella, C.A.; Bess, R.; Zielewski, E.H.; & Geen, R. (2006). The Cost of Protecting Vulnerable Children V: Understanding State Variation in Child Welfare Financing. Retrieved online, October 3, 2006. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. back
  47. Ibid. back
  48. CWLA (2007) Special AFCARS tabulation. back
  49. U.S. General Accounting Office. (March 2003). Child Welfare: HHS Could Play a Greater Role in Helping Child Welfare Agencies Recruit and Retain Staff. Retrieved online, January 14, 2005. Washington, DC: Author. back
  50. Ibid. back
  51. Ibid. back
  52. Child Welfare League of America. (2006). State Child Welfare Agency Survey. Washington, DC: Author; U.S. Census Bureau. (2005). Median Income for 4-Person Families, by State. Retrieved online, October 3, 2006. Washington, DC: Author. back




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