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Home > Advocacy State Fact Sheets for 2004 > State Fact Sheets for 2000

 
 

North Carolina's Children

State Population (1998)1
State Population under 18 (1998)1
State Poverty Rate (1998)2
Poverty Rate for Children Ages 5-17 (1998)2
  7,546,000
1,920,000
14%
20%

Child Abuse and Neglect

  • In 1997, 104,950 children were reported abused or neglected in North Carolina, an increase of 41.4% from 1990.3 Twenty-three children died as a result of abuse or neglect in 1998.4
  • In 1996, 10,880 children in North Carolina lived apart from their families in out-of-home care,5 an increase of 51.7% since 1990.6
  • In 1998, public child welfare agencies in North Carolina placed 83 children into adoptive homes, a 71.3% decrease since 1995.7

Child Health

  • According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, 285,435 North Carolina children are not covered by health insurance throughout the year, and 439,353 North Carolina children are enrolled in Medicaid, SCHIP and other state sponsored programs.8 In 1995, 44% of births in North Carolina were paid for by Medicaid.9
  • In 1996, there were 25,240 pregnancies to 15-19 year old North Carolina young women.10 Seventy-five percent of the 15,296 births to these young women were out-of-wedlock. 11
  • Through June 1999, there were 12,015 adults/adolescents and 159 children under the age of 13 in North Carolina living with HIV/AIDS.12 Nationally, estimated AIDS incidences continue to increase overall.13

Child Care and Education

  • In 1998, 17,221 North Carolina children, mostly under 5 years of age, were served by Head Start.14
  • In North Carolina, 78.4% of high school seniors graduated in 199715 and 81.4% of high school seniors graduated in 1998.16

Violence

  • In 1997, 92 young people, ages 0-19, were killed by firearms in North Carolina. In the United States, 12 children a day are killed by guns.17
  • In 1998, 55,594 children were arrested in North Carolina. Of these arrests, 5.3% were for a violent crime and 2.8% were for possession of a weapon.18

Alcohol, Drugs, and Smoking

  • In 1997, 35% of North Carolina high school students were currently using cigarettes.%19
  • According to the state alcohol and drug abuse directors, 827,428 North Carolina residents need alcohol and/or substance abuse treatment. 20

Income Support

  • As of June 1999, the TANF program provided income support for food, shelter, clothing and other essential living expenses for 124,432 recipients in North Carolina.21
  • From January 1998 to June 1999, the number of North Carolina families receiving TANF income support assistance fell from 68,020 to 55,429. The number of U.S. families on TANF fell by 38.4% during this period.22
  • In July 1999, the income of a family of three receiving TANF and Food Stamp benefits in North Carolina was 48%23 below the federal poverty guideline of $13,880.24
  • In 1997, 19.0% of child support cases in North Carolina collected support.25
  • In 1999, the average rent a family paid in North Carolina was $519. A worker in North Carolina earning the minimum federal wage would have to work 78 hours a week to afford this rent.26 This rent is 190.8% of the maximum TANF cash assistance grant of $272 per month.27

References

  1. U.S. Bureau of the Census. (1999). Statistical abstract of the United States: 1997. (119 edition). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
  2. U.S. Bureau of the Census. (1999). Annual demographic survey March supplement: Poverty status by state and ten large metropolitan areas in 1998. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
  3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Child Abuse and Neglect. (1998). Child maltreatment 1997: Reports from the states to the Child Abuse and Neglect. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.
  4. National Committee to Prevent Child Abuse (NCPCA). (1999). Current trends in child abuse reporting and fatalities: The results of the 1998 annual fifty state survey. Chicago, IL: NCPCA Publications.
  5. Curtis, P., & Petit, M. (1999). Child abuse and neglect: A look at the states. The 1999 CWLA stat book. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America.
  6. Curtis, P., & Petit, M. (1997). Child abuse and neglect: A look at the states. The 1997 CWLA stat book. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America.
  7. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children's Bureau. (1999). Adoption Incentive Program Data. [Online]. Available: www. acf.dhhs.gov/programs.cb. North American Council on Adoptable Children (NACAC). (2000). Preliminary reports January-May 1999, state by state finalized adoptions. Minneapolis, MN: NACAC (* =NACAC totals, otherwise DHHS totals). CWLA calculations.
  8. American Academy of Pediatrics. (November 23, 1999). Health Insurance status of U.S. Children through age 18, year 2000 projections. Elk Grove Village, IL.
  9. The Kaiser Commission on the Future of Medicaid. (1997). Medicaid expenditures and beneficiaries: National and state profiles and trends, 1990-1995. Washington DC: Author.
  10. The Alan Guttmacher Institute (1999). Teenage Pregnancy: Overall Trends and State by State Information. [Online]. Available: www.agi-usa.org. New York, NY: Author.
  11. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. (August 1999). Fact Sheet: Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing. [Online]. Available: www.teenpregnancy.org.
  12. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (1999). HIV/AIDS surveillance report. Vol.11, No.1. Washington, DC: Author.
  13. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (1996). HIV & AIDS trends. Washington, DC: Author.
  14. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children, Youth, and Families. (1999). Head Start statistical fact sheet. [Online]. Available: www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs. Washington, DC: Author.
  15. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (1998). Public school student, staff, and graduate counts by state, school year 1996-1997. [Online]. Available: www.nces.ed.gov. Calculation by National Library of Education.
  16. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (1997). Public school student, staff, and graduate counts by state, school year 1997-1998. [Online]. Available: www.nces.ed.gov. Calculation by National Library of Education.
  17. Children's Defense Fund (1999). Children and Guns: A Children's Defense Fund Report on Children Dying from Gunfire in America. Washington, DC: Author.
  18. U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. (1999). Crime in the United States: 1998. Washington, DC: Author.
  19. Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. (2000). The Toll of Tobacco In the States. [Online]. Available: www.tobaacofreekids.org. Washington, DC: Author.
  20. National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors. (1999). Alcohol and Other Drug treatment Needs. [Online]. Available: www.nasadad.org.
  21. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. (1999). Change in welfare caseloads since enactment of new welfare law. [Online]. Available: www.acf.dhhs.gov/news/stats/aug-sept.
  22. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. (1999). Change in welfare caseloads since enactment of new welfare law. [Online]. Available: www.acf.dhhs.gov/news/stats/case-fam.
  23. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food, and Consumer Service. (1999). Food stamp program monthly allotments and deductions. Washington, DC: Author. Calculations by CWLA.
  24. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (1999). Annual update of the HHS poverty guidelines. Washington, DC: Author.
  25. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Support Enforcement. (1998). Preliminary statistical program status, FY 1997. Washington, DC: Author. Calculations by CWLA.
  26. National Low Income Housing Coalition. (1999). Estimated state metro FMR's and related characteristics. (1999). Washington, DC: Author.
  27. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. (1999). TANF Report to Congress: work related provisions of state TANF plans. Washington, DC: Author. Calculations by CWLA.

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